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Japanese researchers have developed a liquid electronics material that powers wearable devices

Japanese researchers have developed a liquid electronics material that powers wearable devices
Japanese researchers have developed a liquid electronics material that powers wearable devices
Researchers at the International Material Nano-Building Research Center (WPI-MANA) under the National Institute of Materials Science (NIMS) have developed a "liquid electronic" material that powers a new generation of wearable electronic mobile devices.

According to foreign media Wearable Technologies, this discovery will help designers integrate flexible electromechanical devices (including such as pacemakers, surgical tools, muscle-driven energy harvesters, communication devices and self-powered wearable electronic devices) Medical sensors such as smart textiles).

This new "liquid electret" material has electromechanical and electroacoustic properties, and it also has very good flexibility and stretchability. These characteristics are essential for the reliable and durable power supply design of electronic equipment.
 
The electret is a key component for powering electromechanical equipment. It works like a battery or a "permanent electric body" corresponding to a permanent magnet during operation.

The electrets used in such devices are usually solid films made of insulating polymer materials. But for now, the liquid electret material should be a better solution-it has flexibility and stretchability. This solution can greatly improve the availability of the equipment it supplies. In addition, liquid materials have many unique advantages, such as the rapid diffusion of molecules, ease of processing, no defects and high deformability, which are all urgent requirements for flexible / stretchable device technology.
 
Researchers at MANA have also developed a new method for producing electrets. They use a charged liquid porphyrin π Shielded Pi-unit to make the electret. In fact, the researchers made this liquid electret to confirm its electromechanical and electroacoustic properties. They shielded their π cores with hydrophobic and insulating bulky alkyl side chains, which allowed the liquid porphyrin to store charge.